10 Indian cars that look hot with scissor doors

‘Ingress and egress’ is one of the favourite terms used by automotive writers. Not only can they (okay, us) go on to tell you about how wide a door opens, we also master at talking about how difficult a car is to get in and out of. While suicide doors probably offer the best entry and exit, it’s the scissor doors that win on aesthetics. They open upwards, are generally found in sports cars, but their popularity among modified cars cannot be underestimated. We look at a few modified cars which feature scissor, butterfly, or gullwing doors:

 

Chevrolet Beat

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Even in its standard avatar the Beat looks sporty, it has a unique character, and appeals a lot to youngsters. In addition to all that, a set of scissor doors is sure to help the car look better.

 

Honda Accord

Honda Accord modified Autopsyche

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While the Accord is almost a luxo-barge and doesn’t really fall in the tuner’s favourite list of cars, but with a decently powerful engine under the bonnet (especially the V6), the car can be one of the few JDM ways to travel ground fast. Complementing its fast pace are the modified car’s looks. Apart from the bodykit there’s a pair of scissor doors and a split open bonnet, too.

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Maruti Suzuki Swift

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Right from the time it was launched, the Swift has managed to sit on the fine line between the family hatchback and a well handling fun to drive car. If you want your Swift to incline towards the latter, then a set a good looking alloys, a body kit, and of course, a pair of scissor doors won’t hurt.

Maruti Suzuki Kizashi

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The Kizashi failed to turn into a market success, owing to the CBU pricing and the lack of brand value in the premium market that MSIL is now pushing for, via its Nexa dealerships and corresponding products.  However, it was a brilliant product, that not just drove well but looked quite imposing, too. You can of course make it look even better with the inclusion of scissor doors, like Autopsyche did. The good part is that the car looks the same apart from the door conversion, adding to its sleeper character. Until you swing open the doors, that is.

Hyundai i20

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The Hyundai i20 gave the premium hatchback segment a much needed push – one that continues to help the car achieve good sales figures. But apart from being a hatchback that cost as much as a saloon, the i20 brought premium features, and was a product that people really wanted to buy. This also gave way to a few customised versions of the i20, and how could scissor doors remain behind! Modified by Big Daddy Customs – the same people behind the Moon Rover – the custom i20 is from 2012, features a bodykit, HRS alloy wheels, and scissor doors.

Hyundai Elantra

Hyundai Elantra Scissor Doors 1

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While it fails to stand out in any particular aspect, the Hyundai Elantra is one of the nicest all-rounder cars in the segment. It looks great, both on the inside and outside, has an adequately powerful engine, and the ride isn’t bad either. It isn’t certainly honed enough to be an outright enthusiasts’ car, but the looks can be tweaked to make it even more appealing. The particular example with scissor doors, a light blue wrap, a huge wing at the rear, and a custom bodykit managed to stand out.

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Maruti 800

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A two-door Maruti 800 isn’t uncommon, but one that has its doors opening upwards certainly is. With headlamps from a Hyundai Accent and taillamps sourced off a Polo, the custom 800 manages the small car look but with added presence. Black bumpers, red body colour, and a contrasting white roof work in unison to make the car noticeable.

Honda Civic

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Unlike the Accord featured above, the Civic is proper tuner material. It looks fast even when standstill, it drives well, isn’t too long or heavy, and has the JDM essence intact. Having said that, it’s susceptible to overly large bodykits, wings that look out of place, and, as you guessed, scissor doors. Smoked taillamps and dual exhaust at the rear add to the look.

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Mitsubishi Lancer

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And talking about tuners, how can the king of them all go unnoticed. The bodykitted Lancer gets custom wheels (distasteful), a big spoiler at the rear (not bad!), a bodykit (front and rear bumper, side skirts, and flared wheel arches), and scissor doors. Will they look better had the car lost the other paraphernalia? Most probably, yes, but that’s the owner’s choice.

Tata Pixel

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If only Tata Motors could pull this one off…

It is called the Pixel, and was showcased at the 2012 Auto Expo. It won’t be wrong to say that if there’s a futuristic car which needs to be on sale at the moment, the Pixel is it. Powered by a 1.2-litre engine (placed at the rear), the micro car had space for four, boasted a touchscreen-equipped futuristic dashboard and scissor doors. Coolest scissor door car on list? You bet!

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Should you get them?

First and foremost, it’s a matter of personal liking. To some the whole exercise might appear pointless because scissor doors or most vertical conversions for that matter, make the car appear more wannabe, a bit ricer-like, in fact. On the other hand, there are people who see them as value additions. The latter are the same blokes who generally appreciate bodykits and big wings as well. There’s nothing wrong in either school of thought, but decide where you are. Also, scissor doors make getting in and out (see the love for the phrase!) a bit cumbersome, and the retrofit kits can have alignment issues as well. So decide what’s more important, and then choose accordingly.