Nissan Terrano photo gallery: Details explored

The Nissan Terrano is a compact SUV that could be a worthy alternative to sedans in the same price bracket owing to its tough build, high ground clearance and good road presence, while retaining car-like ride and handling. It’s a versatile vehicle that is pretty much at home on the highway as it is in city traffic or on rough roads.

The Terrano will be offered in seven variants, with a choice of a 1.6 litre petrol engine with a five-speed manual transmission, a 1.5 litre diesel engine putting out 84 bhp with a five-speed manual transmission or a 1.5 litre diesel putting out 110 bhp of power with a six-speed manual transmission. At the moment, all the Terrano variants would  be front-wheel drive only, but a 4×4 is likely later in the year.

CarToq recently drove the Nissan Terrano to get a complete feel of the vehicle at Udaipur. See: Nissan Terrano road test and review – upping the style quotient

Here’s more on the Nissan Terrano in pictures:

Stylish exteriors

The front of the Nissan Terrano has been styled just like other Nissan SUVs such as the Pathfinder and new X-Trail. Extensive work has been done to the headlamps and grille. The bumper too has been restyled and is fully body coloured, unlike the Renault Duster, on which it is based.

The more squared-off front styling of the Nissan Terrano actually works quite well in giving it a more premium, upmarket look. After all, it has to command a certain price premium to the Duster as well and needs to look the part.

The fenders don’t appear as pronounced on the Nissan Terrano as they do on the Renault Duster, because more attention is drawn to the front. The bonnet too has been given a couple of crease lines to blend with the grille.

The doors of the Terrano too have been worked upon to make it different from the Renault Duster. The lower crease is a straighter line in the Terrano compared to the swooping curve on the Renault Duster’s doors.

Another distinctive touch is the blacking out of the B and C pillars between the windows to make it look like a seamless glass area. The blacked out portion is just a sticker though. The roof rails too are different, with a monotone colour scheme.

The Nissan Terrano will be offered in five colours, although the colour-range is similar to the Renault Duster’s colour line-up. The Terrano comes in white, black, grey, silver and red. The brown though remains exclusive to the Duster for now.

The black Nissan Terrano has an air of sophistication about it. The variant pictured here is the Nissan Terrano XV diesel with a 110PS, 1.5 litre diesel engine.

The red Nissan Terrano looks the sportiest of the lot. The variant shown here is the XL diesel. The XL Plus upwards all get alloy wheels.

When viewed from the rear the Nissan Terrano has a pretty unique design and doesn’t really bear much resemblance to the Renault Duster. The tail-lamps and the reworked bumper with the concealed tow hook make the Terrano’s rear actually a lot better compared to the Renault Duster.

The huge tail-lamps stand out. The reverse lamp is placed on the boot door. The bumper has large reflectors, but there are no rear fog lamps. The Terrano badging is on the door unlike the Duster which has it on the number plate applique.

The four most worked upon areas of the Nissan Terrano to make it different from the Renault Duster. The twin-beam headlamps with sleek indicators, the uniquely designed rear combination lamp, the bold Nissan grille and the doors and blacked out pillar area.

Clean-looking interiors

Except for the base XE variant, all other variants of the Nissan Terrano get beige interiors with a black-top dashboard. The interior legroom and space is identical to the Renault Duster. The boot is huge and can swallow 475 litres of luggage, while the parcel tray can be removed and seat folded for even more space. The bonnet has a convenient hydraulic strut to hold it in place, allowing for single handed operation and easy opening and closing.

The dashboard of the Terrano has a slightly different centre console compared to the Renault Duster. The centre AC vents are rectangular instead of round and there’s a closed storage box above it. The steering wheel too is different. However, there are no steering-mounted audio controls on any variant.

Some of the quirkiness found on the Renault Duster continues on the Nissan Terrano, such as the rear-view mirror controls being located under the handbrake. All variants of the Terrano get only manual air-conditioning controls. The music system has Bluetooth phone functionality, while the USB and Aux-in connections are located below it. The central door-locking button too is on the dash, but there’s no speed-sensing automatic door locking. The storage box on the dash is very convenient and of good quality.

The instrument panel of the Nissan Terrano is identical to the Renault Duster (which in turn is identical to the Renault Logan / Mahindra Verito as this vehicle is based on the same platform). The simple multi-function display shows distance to empty, range, trip-meter and average fuel consumption.

The rear parking sensors can be turned on or off by a switch on the dash. Power windows don’t have auto-up or auto-down functionality. The chrome door handles are a nice touch. Wiper controls are to the right of the steering, with only two speeds and no mist (single-wipe) function. The headlamp adjuster is a cable-operated one.

The Nissan Terrano XL Plus, XV and XV Premium get 16-inch machined alloy wheels with 215/65 R16 tyres. The other variants all get 16-inch steel wheels with wheel caps. Tyre size is the same for all variants. All our test cars were shod with MRF Wanderer tyres.

Overall, the Nissan Terran definitely does stand out with its unique styling. It is as much at home in the countryside as it is in the city and can tackle highways with ease as well, with good ride quality and handling. However, we wish it had a little more equipment and features for the price segment it’s competing in.

Also see: Nissan Terrano variants and features explained

 

And read: Nissan Terrano ROAD TEST and review – upping the style quotient