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The Chief Justice Of India Has The Coolest Car Number Plate: Proof

chief justice of india dy chandrachud mercedes benz e-class

A picture posted on social media last weekend has sparked a wave of curiosity and admiration. The photo captures the car of the Chief Justice of India, Dhananjaya Y. Chandrachud, and the attention-grabber isn’t its luxurious make (a Mercedes E-Class) but its unique number plate: DL1 CJI 0001.

The picture was shared on X by business leader Lloyd Mathias. He wrote “Saw Chief Justice of India, Dhananjay Chandrachud at a private function in Delhi yesterday. On my way out, I couldn’t help notice his car’s licence plate number: DL1 CJI 0001. Very cool. Wonder if the Chief Election Commissioner’s car number plate is DL1 CEC 0001?”

The combination of the state code, designation, and sequential numbering sparks several questions. Is it a special privilege granted to the Chief Justice? Did the government pull strings to secure this coveted sequence? The answer, surprisingly, lies in India’s Motor Vehicles Act and a dash of bureaucratic serendipity.

As confirmed by the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, vehicles designated for constitutional functionaries, such as the Chief Justice, follow a specific format on their number plates. The first two letters denote the state (DL for Delhi), followed by a code for the designation (CJI in this case). The remaining numbers are typically assigned sequentially according to the date of registration.

The Chief Justice Of India Has The Coolest Car Number Plate: Proof

In this instance, the car was registered on January 1st, 2024, making it the first vehicle assigned the CJI designation for the year. This fortuitous timing resulted in the coveted “0001” sequence, sparking online chatter about the “coolest car number plate” in India.

However, not everyone sees it as simply a cool coincidence. Some critics argue that such unique plates create a sense of elitism and privilege, questioning the necessity for such distinctions. Others raise concerns about potential misuse of power in obtaining special number plates.

The debate highlights the complex relationship between symbolism, status, and accessibility in public transportation. While unique number plates might hold symbolic value, questions remain about their practical purpose and ethical implications.

Interestingly, this isn’t the first time a number plate assigned to a constitutional post has grabbed headlines. In 2017, the President of India’s car sported the number “0001,” leading to similar discussions about privilege and symbolism.

The Chief Justice’s car plate might have ignited a lighthearted online conversation, but it has inadvertently opened a window into a larger discussion about the use of symbols of power and the delicate balance between public service and personal privilege. Ultimately, it’s up to each individual to decide whether they view “DL1 CJI 0001” as a cool coincidence, a symbol of unnecessary distinction, or a spark for a broader conversation about power and accessibility.