Goodbye LML: 10 LML scooters & motorcycles you've forgotten

Goodbye LML: 10 LML scooters & motorcycles you’ve forgotten

Kanpur-based 2-wheeler manufacturer LML (Lohia Machinery Limited) has decided to finally call it quits and terminate all operations with immediate effect. This decision came soon after the bankers rejected a resolution plan for the company. The erstwhile two-wheeler maker has given us some really popular scooters and motorcycles in the past. Here’s a look at 10 such LML scooters and motorcycles.

Select

Definitely, among the most well-recognized scooters of its times, the LML Select range gave a good fight to the likes of Bajaj Chetak. The Select 4, which came in 2011, became the last model in this range. It carried pretty much the same design but looked slightly more modern due to clear-lens indicators and a rectangular headlamp. Powering the LML Select 4 was a 147.5cc single-cylinder engine that offered a maximum power of 8.6 Bhp along with a peak torque of 11.3 Nm. The motor comes mated to a 4-speed manual transmission.

NV

The LML NV was definitely the most popular LML offering ever. The NV looked slightly more upmarket than the Bajaj Chetak and even felt gruntier, which were the two biggest reasons behind its success. The last iteration of this scooter was launched in 2013. It was powered by a 149.56cc 2-stroke engine that produced a maximum power of 8.5 Bhp and 11 Nm. The engine came mated to a four-speed manual transmission.

Adreno

The Adreno’s claim-to-fame was its quarter-fairing, which made it the only motorcycle of its kind. Well, the Adreno did look sporty enough but was as commuter-ish as its peers. But this didn’t stop many from lapping up this motorcycle for the arguably racy looks. Powering the LML Adreno was a 110cc, 4-stroke engine that offered a maximum of 8.5 Bhp along with a peak torque of 7.5 Nm. The motor came mated to a 5-speed manual transmission, which was quite a novelty back then.

Energy

lml energy

 

The Energy was merely a naked version of the Adreno. It looked pretty handsome in comparison to other offerings in the segment. It featured the same 110cc motor that offered 8.5 Bhp and 7.5 Nm. It came mated to a four-speed manual transmission.

Freedom

 

The Freedom bought a lot of success to LML in the commuter segment. Bits like alloy wheels and a large bikini fairing made it look more premium than most of the rivals. Also, the 109.1 cc, single-cylinder engine was fairly potent and refined. It offered a maximum power of 8.5 Bhp along with a peak torque of 8.5 Nm. The motor came mated to a 4-speed manual transmission.

Freedom Prima 125

 

The Freedom Prime 125 was basically a more powerful Freedom with a 125cc heart. The motorcycle was powered by a new 125cc engine that offered a maximum power of 10.7 Bhp along with a peak torque of 10.4 Nm. The motorcycle offered a front disc brake, which wasn’t a common feature back then.

Graptor

LML even tried taking on the rather invincible Bajaj Pulsar 150 with the Graptor. The Graptor was easily the most handsome motorcycle back then. It was designed by an Italian company called as Ugolini. The design did bring the motorcycle into some limelight. Even the performance from 150.8cc, 4-stroke, single-cylinder engine was adequate. It produced a maximum power of 13.5 Bhp along with a peak torque of 12.8 Nm. However, the motor didn’t feel as grunty as the DTSi motor of the Pulsar. Also, a poor after-sales service network kept buyers away from this motorcycle.

Beamer

 

The Beamer was the naked version of the Graptor. Unfortunately, it met with even lesser success. Powering this motorcycle was the same 150.8cc engine that powered the Graptor. For the Beamer, however, the motor was tweaked slightly to offer 14 Bhp and 13 Nm. It got a 5-speed manual transmission.

Star Euro 150

 

The LML Star Euro 150 was a huge attempt by the Kanpur-based company to revitalize the sales performance of its scooters. The Star Euro 150 looked pretty funky. The chrome-plated mirrors, round headlamp, and alloy wheels made it look sufficiently modern while a Vespa-like design gave it a metrosexual touch. Powering the Star Euro 150 was powered by a 150.82cc air-cooled 4-stroke engine that offered a maximum power of 9.4 Bhp.

Star Euro 200

The Star Euro 200 was the most expensive LML scooter ever. It was powered by a 199.89cc, single-cylinder, 4-stroke engine that offered a maximum power of 9.1 Bhp along with a peak torque of 19.9 Nm. The engine came mated to a 4-speed manual gearbox.


×

Subscibe our Newsletter