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Brand new Honda WR-V gets a custom paint job, and looks absolutely GORGEOUS

The Honda WR-V is a compact crossover based on the Jazz hatchback, and ever since its introduction in the Indian car market more than a year ago, the WR-V has been outselling the Jazz every single month. However, modified examples of the WR-V have been far in between. Here’s one such example that shows what a creative paint job can achieve. This Honda WR-V was driven straight from the showroom to the paint shop of Gloss Ceramic Coating in Chennai. The video below will show you what the final result is.

As the video indicates, the brand new, freshly repainted Honda WR-V looks absolutely gorgeous. The triple tone paint job that tastefully mixes colours such as red, white and black gives the compact crossover a very sporty look. The alloy wheels, wing mirrors, door handles, the roof rails and the roof itself have been painted black for a contrast  finish. What’s not known though is the engine that powers this car. The WR-V currently sold in India is offered with two engine options, both of which are borrowed from the Honda Jazz.

The petrol is the revvy and refined 1.2 liter i-VTEC unit with 87 Bhp of peak power and 110 Nm of peak torque. A 5  speed manual gearbox is standard with this engine. The diesel is a 1.5 liter, all-alumonium i-DTEC unit with 98.6 Bhp  of peak power and 200 Nm of peak torque. The diesel engine gets a 6 speed manual gearbox. Both gearboxes drive the front wheels of the car. There’s no all wheel drive mode on offer even as an option, and even an automatic gearbox is not a part of the WR-V’s variant line up.

 

The lack of an automatic gearbox on the petrol powered WR-V is a surprising miss as the Jazz gets such an option.  Honda may have skipped the automatic gearbox on the WR-V to keep the final price in check. Talking prices, the  Honda WR-V’s pricing start from 7.98 lakhs, ex-showroom Delhi, which makes it a lot more expensive than sub-4 meter compact SUVs such as the Tata Nexon, Ford EcoSport and the recently launched Mahindra XUV300. Yet, sales of the WR-V are strong, thanks mainly to the Honda badge value, the versatile and spacious interiors of the WR-V, good quality levels all around and impeccable reliability.

While the WR-V is indeed based on the Jazz, and is a Jazz on stilts, Honda’s engineers have given this compact  crossover many engineering changes. One such change that really stands out is in the suspension department. The WR-V has very good ride quality, and can merrily take rough roads on. The high ground clearance is a boon. Think of it as a rough road edition of the Jazz, and you immediately will realize why the WR-V is selling more than the hatchback it is based on.