Royal Enfield Interceptor 650-based Flat Tracker: What it could look like

Royal Enfield Interceptor 650-based Flat Tracker: What it could look like

Royal Enfield is just months away from launching two brand new motorcycles in India – the Interceptor 650 street bike and the Continental GT650 cafe racer. Both motorcycles will use a 650cc, four stroke parallel twin engine with 47 Bhp of peak power and 52 Nm of peak torque. The engine will be paired to a 6 speed manual gearbox that will have a slipper clutch as standard. The new engine and platform are expected to underpin a new range of Royal Enfield motorcycles in India – from Scramblers and Cruisers, to Flat Trackers. Here is a speculative render that shows what a Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 based Flat Tracker could look like.

Royal Enfield did sell the Zundapp Fury 200cc, single cylinder two stroke bike in India during the 1980s, and the Flat Tracker render seems to be a tribute to this fast and tech-packed (for its time) motorcycle. The render shows a tall motorcycle with grippy tyres, upside down front forks, a flat and wide handlebar, an exhaust exiting out from the left side, a slim and short fuel tank, a short seat and a high mounted mudguard. The tyres seem dual purpose, and from the looks of it, the Royal Enfield Fury 650 Flat Tracker seems to have the hardware that will make it capable of being ridden well off the road. Disc brakes are standard on both wheels, which are wire spoked.

ABS is also expected to be standard considering the fact that all Royal Enfield twins will get this feature. At the center of it all is the 650cc, parallel twin motor. This engine is the latest and most technologically advanced unit from Royal Enfield. Oil cooling, fuel injection, four valve heads and an overhead camshaft are standard on this motor, which is designed to rev to over 7,000 rpm. The frame used on the Royal Enfield Fury 650 render is similar to that seen on the Interceptor and Continental GT. This double cradle frame has been developed by the UK-based Harris Engineering, a firm that has now been acquired by Royal Enfield.

Via Behance

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